Wednesday, October 29, 2014

Accepting ourselves for who God created us to be


It's not a big deal when an aging movie star attempts to stay young with cosmetic enhancements to their face and body. But this was different. The recent photos of Renee Zellweger’s new look have social media all abuzz, and had many of her fans scratching their heads.  Many were disturbed because Zellweger had so radically changed the look of her face. It's not that her new look was that bad.  Most would agree that her new look was beautiful.  What made Renee's change hard to accept is that the unique look that she had surgically altered is what we loved about her! Her natural appearance, her narrow eyes and high cheek bones, along with her personality gave her that lovable quality that endeared her to us. She was unique and beautiful, not by the typical standards of today’s models, but because of her unique facial features.
  
I don't want to be judgmental. I think most all of us do some enhancing along the way, even if it’s only with makeup or hair coloring. Few of us live in the world of those who can afford to get a whole new face. What I find so fascinating and troubling is to see a person who felt the need to change a unique, beautiful and loveable face into such a generic appearance.

I have no clue what motivated her to change but it may be a good insight into the human psyche and the culture that influences our choices. Isn't it ironic that the thing that drew people to Renee, the features that gave her that unique face that actually made her a star, are the features she disliked most about herself.  When we look at a picture of ourselves, we are often drawn to the one or two characteristics that we dislike.  It’s human nature.  And maybe for Renee Zellweger, her eyes and cheeks were what she disliked about herself.

Wouldn't it be great if we all focused more on enhancing our inner being, our character and integrity, than our physical appearance?  It is a lot less expensive but requires much more time and work.  

Here are some of the questions and points you could use for discussion with teenagers. 
  • How does the world and today's culture push us to conform? 
  • What is it that makes us want to be so much like everyone else?  
  • How much pressure do you feel from your peers to change and conform to the fashionable standards of our society?
  • Why have we lost our ability to see the beauty in the unique? 
  • Why do we make fun of people who have unique physical features?
  • Is it wrong to want to change or enhance our physical appearance?
  • As believers in Jesus Christ, can we actually rejoice in how God made us and accept our uniqueness?
  • In this crazy upside-down world, how can we learn to have a healthy respect for our own unique bodies and to also respect others who are different?
  • What does the Bible say about outward appearances vs. the inner man or woman?  
  • What are your unique features and characteristics that God has  given you?


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